Thailand: the slave monkeys of the coconut industry

A disturbing PETA exposé reveals that terrified young monkeys in Thailand are kept chained, driven insane, abusively trained, and forced to climb trees to pick coconuts used to make coconut water, milk, oil, and other products that are sold around the world, including in Australia.

 

For the Thai coconut industry, many monkeys are reportedly illegally abducted from their families and homes in nature when they’re just babies.

They’re fitted with rigid metal collars and kept chained or tethered until they’re no longer useful to farmers.

The terrified young monkeys are forced to perform frustrating and difficult tasks, such as twisting heavy coconuts until they fall off the trees from a great height.

An investigator learned that if monkeys try to defend themselves, their canine teeth may be pulled out.

Some monkeys were transported in cramped cages that were barely large enough for them to turn around in, and others were left in locked cages on the back of a ute with no shelter from the pouring rain. One monkey was seen frantically shaking the cage bars in a vain attempt to escape.

Take Action

Please make sure that your coconut products don’t come from suppliers that use monkey labor. Avoid the brands Aroy-D and Chaokoh – also sold as TCC in Australia – and all coconut products from Thailand.

In general, coconut products originating in Brazil, Colombia, Hawaii, India, and the Philippines are supplied by companies that don’t use monkey labor.

Sign below to urge Aroy-D and Chaokoh to stop supporting this cruel industry by obtaining their coconuts from companies that don’t exploit monkeys.

 

https://secure.peta.org.au/page/54877/action/1

 

My Comment and Information: The next time you use coconut milk when cooking, check out the packaging. If it comes from Thailand, the nuts were probably picked by tortured monkeys, southern pig monkeys. Don`t buy it!

In the province of Prachuap Khiri Khan, Thailand’s largest coconut palm growing region, they work as slaves eight hours a day, six days a week – as the Thai labor law also stipulates for people as maximum working hours.

For more…at https://worldanimalsvoice.com/2020/07/03/thailand-the-slave-monkeys-of-the-coconut-industry/

 

My best regards to all, Venus