German showjumper abuses “Good Luck” in front of the camera

Opinions differ on the ethical and, in our eyes, clearly cruel background to showjumping.

However, the fact is that only recently in January of this year a horse was brazenly and cold-heartedly beaten with a whip by the German showjumping professional Kevin Lemke in front of an audience.

And this is proven by a horrific video of evidence that any doubters can watch under the following link (be careful: not for the faint of heart !!!): https://vimeo.com/516459284

During a show jumping competition in California, the horror scenes occurred after the horse “Good Luck” refused to jump over an obstacle.

PETA Germany immediately demanded legal action against the alleged animal abuser, PETA USA has already filed a criminal complaint.

The “Desert International Horse Park” was the scene of this cruelty to animals.
“Good Luck” refused to jump over an obstacle and in a probably uncontrolled, massive outburst of aggression you can see Kevin Lemke hitting the poor animal like crazy.

The showjumper proceeds with incredible rigor so that the whip whips can not only be seen clearly on the evidence video but can also be heard.
This earned the German disqualification.
But the torture continued.

Disqualified show jumpers are still allowed to take part in the so-called correction jump after they have been eliminated.
When riding a combination, the battered horse stumbled over the first obstacle due to the extremely stressful situation in which it was and refused the following.

Kevin Lemke with “Good Luck” – This is about more than a mere rule violation – it’s about cruelty to animals.

Continue reading

Spain: Live Animal Export Update 28/2/21 – Cattle stranded on ship in Spain must be destroyed, say vets.

 

 

Please add your voice to the Anna Maria petition at petition: Nearly 2,500 cows are sick and dying after having been stranded at sea for 2 months and counting, demand help! (thepetitionsite.com) and leave a comment on this in the box – thank you.

Cattle stranded on ship in Spain must be destroyed, say vets

Spanish officials recommend 864 cows that have been at sea for two months are no longer fit for transport

 

Cattle stranded on ship in Spain must be destroyed, say vets | Animal welfare | The Guardian

More than 850 cattle that have spent months adrift in the Mediterranean are no longer fit for transport and should be killed, according to a confidential report by Spanish government veterinarians.

A lawyer for the cattle ship’s management company told the Guardian on Saturday that he planned to resist the move, even as a video from the port appears to show preparations being made to unload the cattle.

The cows have been kept in what an animal rights activist described as “hellish” conditions on the Karim Allah, which docked at the south-eastern Spanish port of Cartagena on Thursday after struggling for two months to find a buyer for the cattle.

The report, compiled after Spanish officials were able to board the vessel earlier this week, said that the captain had told them of 22 deaths among the 895 calves on-board.

Another nine cattle were not accounted for, it said. The ship’s management said the calves, all bulls, are about seven to eight months old now.

The report concluded that the animals had suffered from the lengthy journey and were generally in a poor state. Some of them were unwell and not fit for transport outside of the European Union, nor should they be allowed into the EU, it said. Euthanasia would be the best solution for their health and welfare, it concluded.

The animals were rejected by several countries over fears they had bovine bluetongue virus. The report did not say if the cattle had bluetongue disease but it noted a range of other skin, eye and leg conditions including alopecia, flaking, scabs and joint inflammation compatible with septic arthritis.

The lawyer, Miquel Masramón who represents the ships’ management company, said on Saturday that it appeared preparations to kill the cattle were being made at the port. In a video Masramón sent to the Guardian, a metal ramp can be seen leading down from a ship toward a series of metal containers lined up along a dock wall.

The lawyer said the ship’s managers will attempt to resist any move to unload the cattle and that he is in the process of contacting Lebanese authorities. The vessel is owned by Khalifeh Livestock Trading and managed by Talia Shipping Line, both based in Lebanon, while the cattle are owned by a third party.

“In the video you see the closed containers, they are not for living livestock,” said Masramón on Saturday. “We have no official information, but we think they will discharge the animals and then kill them with electrical guns.”

He added that blood samples taken from the cattle on Wednesday night by Talia Shipping Line, to test for a bovine disease called bluetongue, had been blocked at the port by Spanish authorities and were not allowed to proceed to a lab for analysis.

The insect-borne bluetongue virus causes lameness and haemorrhaging among cattle but does not affect humans. The Spanish ministry’s report counted 864 animals alive on board the Karim Allah this week. Twenty-two cows had died at sea with two corpses still onboard, it noted, adding that the remains of the others that died were chopped up and thrown overboard during the journey.

Spain’s agricultural ministry did not reply to a request for comment on Saturday.

Masramón previously told the Guardian the shippers aimed to resell the cattle outside the EU if they tested negative for bluetongue. Talia Shipping Line estimates that current losses on the cattle transport could be up to €1m. Spanish authorities have said the company was also liable for the cost of killing the animals and destroying the carcasses. The company estimates this will cost them a further €1m.

“We are trying to resist, if they take the animals, and to get a new private expert animal health report,” said Masramón. He added, however, that if Spanish authorities were to remove the animals on health grounds they would probably succeed.

“In my opinion the animal health regulations will prevail [over maritime ones] and they, [the] Spanish officials, will be able to take the animals and cull them,” he said.

Masramón said although he was not an animal health technician, he did not agree with the official Spanish veterinary report released on Friday“From what I understand, none of the diseases [noted in the report] are worth euthanizing the cattle for. They are normal after two months at seas and the animals could recover.”

In an interview, a source close to a second cattle ship, the Elbeik, which has similarly been at sea for two months since leaving the Spanish port of Tarragona with a cargo of nearly 1,800 cows, said he was watching the Karim Allah developments closely.

The Elbeik is currently moored off the Turkish Cypriot port of Famagusta having loaded animal fodder and straw. The source said that once the loading was complete, the Elbeik would probably sail to Greece to load bunker fuel for the ship.

Asked about apparent moves by the Spanish authorities to begin unloading and killing the cattle, the source said the health problems identified by the official Spanish vet report could “easily heal”. He said the decision, if taken, to kill all the animals was “amazing”. He added: “If the animals can heal why would they want to do that?”

Spain: Live Export Update 28/2/21 – Cattle Stranded on Ship in Spain Must be Destroyed, Say Vets. – World Animals Voice

Below – EU Animal Crisis Management – Mr Bernard Van Goethem – Does not react when there is an ‘Animal Crisis’;

Bernard Van Goethem (@VanGoethemB) | Twitter

More like:

When You Have An EU Animal Crisis, Do Not Hope For Responses or Action From The EU ‘Crisis Management’ Team !

Please add your voice to the Anna Maria petition at petition: Nearly 2,500 cows are sick and dying after having been stranded at sea for 2 months and counting, demand help! (thepetitionsite.com) and leave a comment on this in the box – thank you.

WAV Comment:  we have been attempting to give the latest updates on the situation of the stranded and abused cattle for a few weeks now.

 

See Search Results for “karim allah” – World Animals Voice  for Karim Allah

See Search Results for “elbeik” – World Animals Voice  for Elbeik

There is an old saying which goes “a picture says a thousand words”.  Have a look at these 2 pictures of the ‘Karim Allah’: are they not fairly indicative of the majority of the live animal transport maritime situation now ? – rust bucket ships that should have been scrapped years ago still transporting innocent, sentient beings to their (often) barbaric deaths the world over.

Have a look at this picture – this is Mr Bernard Van Goethem.

Bernard Van Goethem (@VanGoethemB) | Twitter

Here below is the structural chart for the Commission of Health and Food Safety – Sante.  Mr Van Goethem is the ‘leader’ responsible for ‘Crisis Preparedness in Animals’, which includes ‘section G2 – Animal Health’.  You can see all of this on the right hand side of the chart.

Health and Food Safety Organizational chart link – https://ec.europa.eu/info/sites/info/files/organisation_charts/organisation-chart-dg-sante_en.pdf 

Further; on the Health and Food Safety site they make the following statement; and we include the link as proof:

https://ec.europa.eu/food/animals/welfare/practice/transport_en  – it says:

Animal welfare during transport

In 2015, the European Commission launched a three-year Pilot Project aiming at improving animal welfare during transport by developing and disseminating Guides to Good and Best Practice for the transport of the main livestock species.

In September 2017, the contractor of the project published five extensive guides to good practices (only in English) as well as 17 technical fact sheets focusing on the most practical information in A4 format. Fact sheets are available in eight EU languages (English, French, German, Greek, Italian, Polish, Romanian and Spanish).

This publication is followed by a road show in eight Member States and presenting the guidelines to the professionals concerned (transporters, drivers, farmers, official veterinarians, etc.). The project will also produce five videos (one per species in eight languages).

For more details please visit the Project website.

See the final report

Council Regulation EC 1/2005 defines the responsibilities of all actors involved in the transport chain of live animals entering or leaving the EU. It lays down efficient monitoring tools and stricter rules for the transport and for the specific checks to be carried out by officials. It also provides for non-discriminatory inspections of animals, means of transport and accompanying documents.

EU countries are required to submit to the Commission, by 30 June each year, an annual report for the previous year on the non-discriminatory inspections together with an analysis of the major deficiencies. Click here to access the annual reports.

In order to reduce the administrative burden on EU countries, Commission Implementing Decision 2013/188/EU, which came into force on 1 January 2015, established an harmonised model form for the annual reports.

We at WAV, as of 28/2/21, make the following statement:  Is the situation where hundreds of live EU animals have been stranded in the Mediterranean on 2 different ships not a ‘crisis’ ? – and should we have not seen intervention by the EU ‘Crisis Preparedness in Animals’ team, led Mr Mr Van Goetyhem, on this issue several weeks ago ?  If this is not a crisis, then what is ?

If the EU crisis team are not going to get involved and take action at times of a crisis, then what is the point of them even existing ?

As you can see from the various EU links above; they at EU Commissions are specialists at blowing their own trumpets; leading the reader / web site visitor all over the place to find information (or maybe confuse them !) on their highly constructed, expensive, and detailed website; (at EU taxpayers expense); in some wildly bland attempt to make the reader think that they are completely and utterly in charge of the situation when it comes to controls and regulations for the welfare of animals in transport. 

Well they are not – the website and all the sub sections and statements are simply massive smokescreens because they, the EU Commission, are utterly incapable of having any controls over the international situation of ensuring live animals welfare during transport throughout the EU, and way beyond into third countries such as Turkey and Libya.

In the past, and going back more than a decade, we have called for the resignation of Mr Bernard Van Goethem – Mr Van Goethem Resign Now !! | Serbian Animals Voice (SAV) 

This was in relation all those years ago to the EU having no control of the welfare of animals during transport; here is a video produced at the time to show that:

Here are a few other links we published on this issue at the time:

 

https://serbiananimalsvoice.com/2016/06/06/the-eu-excuses-get-more-pathetic-by-the-day-contact-mr-van-goethem-and-show-your-disgust/

 

https://serbiananimalsvoice.com/2016/06/17/uk-map-proves-uk-is-ready-to-wave-eu-goodbye-van-goethem-and-others-have-failed-the-animals/

 

https://serbiananimalsvoice.com/2016/06/07/eu-must-ensure-animal-welfare-or-mr-van-goethem-will-get-you-and-the-next-joke-is/

So what changes over all these years at the EU ? – very little it seems.  Plenty of waffle; plenty of PR; plenty of web news; people are doing this, and people are doing that; when in reality, nothing actually changes for animals in transport.

As you can see in the above links, in the past we have called for the resignation of Mr Van Goethem; we think that with these terrible situations over the last few months and not a whisper from the EU on the crisis from the crisis management section of the EU Commission; maybe it is time to get another petition underway calling for resignations due to incompetence.  When we get this organised we will publish.

Regards Mark

The cows, who have spent days without food, have suffered during the journey and should be killed, vets say
Cattle on the Karim Allah in Cartagena

Latest news:

Saturday 27/2/21:

More than 850 cows that have spent two months at sea on a ship crossing the Mediterranean are facing slaughter, following a report from Spanish vets.

The cattle have suffered “hellish” conditions, according to animal rights activists.

The Karim Allah vessel originally left the Spanish port of Cartagena to deliver the cattle to Turkey but were refused entry due to fears over bluetongue.

The insect-borne bovine virus causes lameness and haemorrhaging among cattle but does not affect humans.

After being turned away from Turkeyowners failed to find a new buyer for the animals.

The ship was subsequently rejected by several more countries, even to replenish animal feed, leaving the cows to go several days with just water.

The ship became a pariah vessel and it has now returned to its starting point in Cartagena.

The confidential report by Spanish government veterinarians and seen by Reuters says the animals have suffered from the long journey and should be killed.

While it did not confirm whether the animals were suffering from bluetongue or not, it said they should not be allowed into the EU.

Ownership of the cattle is unclear.

Animal rights activist Silvia Barquero, director of the Igualdad Animal NGO, called the crossing “hellish” for the cattle and questioned what had happened to the waste produced by the cows during the crossing.

“We are sure they are in unacceptable sanitary conditions.”

Twenty-two cows are believed to have died at sea, and while 20 of the corpses have been chopped up and thrown overboard, two dead cows remain on board.

A lawyer representing the ship owner Talia Shipping Line, which is registered in Lebanon, said he believes the slaughter will now definitely go ahead.

Meanwhile, a second ship, the ElBeik, which also set sail from Spain in December with a cargo of nearly 1,800 cows, is currently moored off the Turkish Cypriot port of Famagusta.

The agriculture ministry has been approached for comment

Over 850 cows on pariah ship in Mediterranean facing slaughter after bluetongue fears | World News | Sky News