Burger King Constently Fails A Policy To Rectify Deforestation. Petition To Send.

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This handout image taken on November 19, 2007 shows an orangutan with an injection dart in his side - given to make him sleep before rangers relocate him to another place on Borneo island. In the middle of Borneo island, the struggle against the deforestation is lead by Yayasan Orangutan Indonesia (Yayorin) who convinces indigenous people not to sell their lands to palm oil companies, which is vital to the orangutan. At the end of 2008, more than 15,000 hectares of the community forest in Central Kalimantan have been sold for palm oil plantations threatening the livelihood of 2,500 people. RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE GETTY OUT AFP PHOTO/HO/CENTER FOR ORANGUTAN PROTECTION (Photo credit should read AFP/AFP/Getty Images)

This handout image taken on November 19, 2007 shows an orangutan with an injection dart in his side – given to make him sleep before rangers relocate him to another place on Borneo island. In the middle of Borneo island, the struggle against the deforestation is lead by Yayasan Orangutan Indonesia (Yayorin) who convinces indigenous people not to sell their lands to palm oil companies, which is vital to the orangutan. At the end of 2008, more than 15,000 hectares of the community forest in Central Kalimantan have been sold for palm oil plantations threatening the livelihood of 2,500 people. (Photo credit should read AFP/AFP/Getty Images)

deforest

Mark,

Orangutans, sloths, and jaguars — Burger King’s palm oil policy is putting endangered species at risk by failing to protect invaluable tropical forests.

Despite years of public outcry, Burger King has failed to commit to a deforestation policy that protects tropical forests. These forests are destroyed to plant more soy and palm that ends up in Burger King’s supply chain.

 

An excavator constructs a canal in recently cleared land in an oil palm concession owned by PT Andalan Sukses Makmur (PT ASMR) concession, a subsidiary of Bumitama Agro Ltd. The area is near Kumai Seberang village, next to Tanjung Puting National Park in Central Kalimantan.

Deforestation accounts for an incredible 10% of global greenhouse gas emissions. Competitors like McDonald’s and Dunkin’ Donuts have committed to eliminating deforestation from their supply chain. It’s not only unconscionable that Burger King’s parent company Restaurant Brands International has failed to do the same — it’s just bad business.

It’s high time RBI do the same to protect tropical rainforests and the amazing wildlife they are home to.

 

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Tell Burger King’s parent company RBI to adopt a No Deforestation policy across its massive global supply chains.

Last year, Burger King scored a woeful 10/100 on the Union for Concerned Scientists’ palm oil scorecard.

 

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Burger King promised to review its rainforest policy back in 2010, but has instead spent the last six years contributing to the destruction of tropical forests, adding to global warming emissions and decimating the habitats of already-threatened species.

There are fewer than 400 Sumatran tigers and 1,500 Borneo pygmy elephants left in the wild because of irresponsible palm oil policies. Their homes are being destroyed to make room for palm oil sold to major global brands like Burger King.

We know that when we come together, we have the power to shift even the biggest corporate players. Just last year, we pressured McDonald’s to commit to 100% sustainable palm oil by 2020. That’s why we’re now pressuring Burger King’s parent company RBI — which also owns Tim Hortons. We want RBI to know that consumers across the world are demanding it adopts a No Deforestation policy before it’s too late.

 

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Urge Burger King’s parent company RBI to implement a No Deforestation policy to protect tropical forests from further destruction.

Thanks for all that you do,
Hanna, Fatah, and the team at SumOfUs

 

 

 

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